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Clean Water Birthday Appeal

Dear Supporter

Happy Birthday, clean water!

The Clean Water Act is turning 35. But our lakes, rivers, and oceans need more support than ever before to ensure that our kids and grandkids enjoy clean, affordable, public water.

A birthday is an occasion for celebration. It’s a time to reflect on our accomplishments, and to thank the people who have helped us along the way. It’s also a time to make plans for even better years ahead.

Next month, the Clean Water Act, one of our most important environmental and public health laws, turns 35. To celebrate, we’ll flood Congress with phone calls urging more support for clean water, and you can help
Back in 1972, the goals of the Clean Water Act were ambitious: to end all pollution in our rivers and lakes. While we’re much better off than we were 35 years ago, 40% of our waterways are still considered dangerous for fishing and swimming.

A big part of the problem is that our pipes and treatment plants are getting old and are in need of repair. And the Bush administration has been slashing funding for clean water year after year, endangering the health of our water and forcing some communities to consider risky privatization deals.

But the times are beginning to change. With your help, we can make sure that our leaders stand up for clean water. With our allies around the country, we’re organizing a National Call-in Day for Clean Water, on October 11. Can you call your Member of Congress on October 11 and pledge to get 10 friends and family members to join you? Sign up here.

Let’s celebrate the 35th Birthday of the Clean Water Act by flooding Congress with calls. We’ll be asking our Representatives to support the creation of a clean water trust fund, which is a long-term, sustainable, and reliable source of funding to upgrade and improve our public water systems. When asked in 2005, 86% of Americans said they support the creation of a program like this for water.

Thanks for stepping up, Victoria Kaplan Organizing Director, Food & Water Watch water(at)fwwatch.org